Dutch Oven vs. French Oven - What's in a Name?
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Created in the 17th century by our neighbors to the north, the Netherlands, the Dutch oven is an iron-constructed cooking vessel with a tight-fitting lid, traditionally used for slow-cooking all manner of meats, soups and stews (among other things) over an open flame. Dutch ovens boast the ability to retain heat and distribute it evenly, delivering flavor-enhancing moisture to its contents. They are typically made from exposed, raw cast iron and are available in varying shades of black.


Features
  • Bare cast iron construction
  • Uniform heat distribution
  • Porous interior that requires seasoning (the time-consuming process of treating the surface with a stick-resistant coating)
  • At home in campfires or on the range

Born of the culinary enlightenment of the early 1900s and the modern cuisine it spread around the globe, the French oven is everything a Dutch oven is and — pardon our Parisian — a whole lot more. Where the Dutch oven is the embodiment of function over form, its successor is, like most things French, a thing of beauty. Heat retention, even heat distribution, one-pot meal potential — it's all inside. But it's the outside that really sets a Le Creuset French oven apart. The cast iron core is twice-coated with the highest quality enamel, creating a smooth glass-like surface that's perfect for searing, browning or braising, and is easy to rinse clean. Easy-grip, larger-than-they-have-to-be handles bookend a perfectly domed lid that showers slow-cooked classics with steam-produced condensation from above, topped off by a phenolic knob that can take the heat and stay in the kitchen for generations of use — all in a painter's palette of trend-setting, kitchen-complementing colors that elevate cooking to a work of art.


Features

  • Sand-colored interior enamel allows for easy monitoring of cooking progress
  • Beautiful inside and out for oven-to-table enjoyment
  • Ready to use right out of the box
  • Colorful, long-lasting enamel is guaranteed for life
  • Lightest weight per quart of any premium cast iron cookware
  • That certain je ne sais quoi

Conclusion:

So what's in a name? As it turns out, a lot, actually: the most innovative, hand-crafted design and the most vibrant, covetable colors, all in a package that's as easy to use as it is to love. Sure, the Dutch may claim to have invented the oven, but after nearly 100 years of experience, all in the same factory in northern France, we think we've perfected it.


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